Tag Archives: saving lives

How to Become a Certified Pool-Spa Operator (CPO)

Hungry and Fit are HUGE supporters of education and continuing education. It is obvious by our occupations that we love teaching people how to do certain things properly in order to be healthier and happier. We also feel that everyone should be able to be educated so one of our goals is to spread that education throughout the world. We feel that the best way to do that right now is to prepare ourselves to be the best teachers we can be through our own education. Just last week, Hungry added another expertise by going through a course to become a certified pool and spa operator.

The course run by the NSPF (National Swimming Pool Foundation) is an in-depth look at many different aspects related to operating a pool. It is a reasonably-priced and length course but you should definitely be passionate about aquatics or water safety in order to take it. The information can be quite dry if you aren’t interested and there is a lot of math involved. The certification lasts for five years before it needs to be renewed. There is no practical exam, rather there is a written exam that consists of 60 questions. It is an open book test and is rather easy, in my opinion.

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Since I am around pools for over 50 hours a week, it is a useful piece of education for me to have. It helps me run the two pools that I work at and understand the multiple pools that I swim in. It also teaches you a lot about hot tubs as well. I have to say that you should use discretion when using hot tubs in commercial locations. A single person can lose a quart of body oils in a hot tub by sitting in it for merely 15 minutes. If those places don’t cycle their water properly or drain the pool enough you are bathing in other people’s filth. I am not trying to gross anyone out but I want you to think about the facility you are using. Most major pools are forced to abide by regulations because they are inspected but many hotels and apartment complexes get away with not treating their pool properly so please be aware.

Fit and her Dad in a hot tub in New Zealand

Fit and her Dad in a hot tub in New Zealand

I am a huge supporter of water safety and making sure that no one ever drowns if it can be helped. My lifetime goal is to make sure everyone in this world knows how to protect themselves from aquatic environments so that they can survive dangerous encounters with water. This CPO course has helped expand my knowledge and if you are looking for a course I would recommend going to NSPF’s website and looking up the class closest to you.

If you have any questions related to pools, hot tubs, spas, aquatics or water safety please leave them in the comment section below! We may not be waterproof but being safe and knowledgeable around water is a part of being hungry and fit! Stay educated and keep educating others!

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BONUS KITTY PIC

Nymeria sitting on Sajah

Nymeria sitting on Sajah

Cats Really Do Have Nine Lives

It was a nightmare of a day. I’ll tell it to you from my (Alana’s) perspective. It’s Monday. I just finished with my last client and had a few hours to get some paperwork done at work. I come back from a great session and look at my phone. I find a string of horrific text messages. Most of them didn’t make sense due to the combination of rushing and the iPhone’s autocorrect. From “Nymeria is dead” to “at petsmart” to “they think there’s something wrong with her abdomen, going to another hospital.” 

First moment back from the hospital

First moment back from the hospital

My hands start shaking, I’m not really sure what’s going on. But from the succession of texts, I know she’s alive. Go ahead and click the link on Nymeria’s name to learn a little more about her. At the humane society, she jumped on my lap at 2 months old and basically adopted me. She’s my baby. Back to the story. So I know she’s alive, but I have no clue what’s going on. My co-worker is very worried, she’s standing next to me (she was with me when I found out Misty died), making sure I’m okay. I don’t get service where I work (call-wise) so I use the work phone to call Chris but he doesn’t pick up.

Her sleepy on my tummy

Her sleepy on my tummy

I rush and collect myself, lucking out with no more clients in the day, grab my stuff and get out. I’m extremely worried, confused, and completely terrified. I can’t lose another kitten. I text him saying I’m coming home. He texts me back the address of the hospital that they’re at. At least she’s alive, I keep reminding myself. That’s all that matters right now. Once I get in a better service zone, I get two voicemails. Both from Chris. The first one, like the texts, was horrific. It was when he thought Nymeria was dead. I don’t think I’ll listen to that one again. The second one was him carrying her to the hospital on foot.

I finally get there and find him in a waiting room. We’re both very shaken and upset. He has pee all over his shirt and blood on his arm. I finally get the story of what happened. Nymeria ran into the bedroom to pee on the cat bed (naughty girl), so Chris grabbed her and put her in the litter box. He’s in rush because he’s behind schedule, and as he’s running (top speed for in the house) out of the bedroom, Nymeria is running her fastest into the bedroom. Bam. They collide. Her head and his foot. It would’ve knocked out a human.

Her arm was shaved for the IV

Her arm was shaved for the IV

She slumped over and stopped breathing. He immediately started performing CPR. All the urine and feces came out of her and she began to get stiff. He called me, but I didn’t pick up since I was with a client. He then went back to it, chest compressions and mouth to mouth. After 10 minutes of resuscitation, she woke up and coughed up blood. She was alive. He saved her. Quickly, he put her in his shirt (I have the car at this point) and goes as quickly as he can to a pet hospital. The first one he finds does an X-ray and is worried about her abdomen and sends him to another hospital.

He gets to Alpenglow Emergency Center and they take her in. I’m with him by the time a doctor comes to talk to us. From the collision, Nymeria suffered head trauma (with swelling in the head) and pulmonary contusions (bruised lungs). Her pupils were different sizes and she was having trouble breathing, but she was doing okay. They had an estimate for costs and all they were going to do for her. It could be up to 48 hours of intensive care. I was still in shock of all this happening. But the doctor explained everything very well and the nurses made sure we were comfortable.

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Nymeria would be put in a oxygenated little room (like a cage, but comfortable with bedding and warmth), given medicine to make the swelling go down and get her pupils back to normal size. She was also put on an IV to stay healthy and hydrated. We were there for two hours. We got to see her before she left. She was pretty out of it and tired, and couldn’t see us properly. The staff there was wonderful and let us know we could call whenever we wanted, no matter what time of day or night. I felt very thankful for that.

I called every few hours, and the updates kept getting better. She soon started eating “like a champ,” being rambunctious, and her pupils returned to normal size. The next day she was walking around without swaying or falling. They said that she would be ready to pick up at 4 that afternoon, because she was off oxygen and doing well.

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I got there at four to pick my girl up and talked with a nurse who had kept good care of her. She said she was probably tired because she didn’t get that much rest because all the staff in the hospital, fell in love with her because they never get babies and, well, Nymeria has that effect. She was well taken care of with lots of TLC. The whole thing actually cost less than their initial low-ball estimate. And I was sent home with lots of information and the assurance that I should call if I have any questions. The staff there really made me feel that they cared and they were there for me and Nymeria.

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Nymeria was pretty exhausted that night, I stayed home with her and just held her while she slept peacefully like she did when she was a baby baby. She’s still a little slow reaction-wise, weak, and quiet, but she’s doing alright. She still gets excited about food and today she even jumped up to lay on the window sill. She will probably be out of it for a few days and probably has a massive head ache. I just feel so enormously lucky to have her here. She is 8 months old now.

Found them today (the second day Nymeria has been out) when I got home

Found them today (the second day Nymeria has been out) when I got home

True to her name,  Nymeria is a fighter. And I hope she will continue to be with us for many years to come. Never take anything for granted and feel grateful for what you have, every moment you have it. We are so so happy to have her with us. It has also made me think about stepping into the animal health career. They are amazing people.

New Rule in the House: No Running